streets-alive:

Primary Flight: “Greensboro Greenway” ( May 2012) - Greensboro, NC
Primary Flight, a Miami-based street art collective, were in North Carolina from April 18th to May 8th to create a mural for the Spring Garden underpass section of downtown Greensboro’s Greenway. A series of events (movies, lectures, and a public opening) provided opportunities to meet the artists and learn more about street art as a medium and movement.  The Primary Flight project was co-produced by The Downtown Greenway and Elsewhere.
The Downtown Greenway is a 4-mile long loop that links neighborhoods across Greensboro through public art, sustainable transporation, and unprecedented green space.
Link: http://www.goelsewhere.org/primary-flight/

streets-alive:

Primary Flight: “Greensboro Greenway” ( May 2012) - Greensboro, NC

Primary Flight, a Miami-based street art collective, were in North Carolina from April 18th to May 8th to create a mural for the Spring Garden underpass section of downtown Greensboro’s Greenway. A series of events (movies, lectures, and a public opening) provided opportunities to meet the artists and learn more about street art as a medium and movement.  The Primary Flight project was co-produced by The Downtown Greenway and Elsewhere.

The Downtown Greenway is a 4-mile long loop that links neighborhoods across Greensboro through public art, sustainable transporation, and unprecedented green space.

Link: http://www.goelsewhere.org/primary-flight/

Recognize downtown Gastonia? This drawing was by Charlotte architect Murray Whisnant for a 1999 Gastonia Downtown Master Plan, spearheaded by my UNC Charlotte colleague David Walters. Now Gastonia is trying to lure artists to its downtown. Read about it here. #urbanism #planning #NorthCarolina 

Recognize downtown Gastonia? This drawing was by Charlotte architect Murray Whisnant for a 1999 Gastonia Downtown Master Plan, spearheaded by my UNC Charlotte colleague David Walters. Now Gastonia is trying to lure artists to its downtown. Read about it here. #urbanism #planning #NorthCarolina 

These beautiful shots are from Suther Prairie, a never-tilled, never-grazed remnant prairie in Cabarrus County, N.C. To learn more about N.C. prairies and to see photo credits, click here.

This is not a joke. This was actually sent to Charlotte City Council members in a memo from the city manager’s office. Got it?

So, the other day I was doing a bicycle experiment with my friend. We were riding bcycles and I had my waterbottle in the basket. I was going fast down 7th Ave, headed away from uptown and I hit a bump…watch what happens.. (Click on the image to activate!) 

So, the other day I was doing a bicycle experiment with my friend. We were riding bcycles and I had my waterbottle in the basket. I was going fast down 7th Ave, headed away from uptown and I hit a bump…watch what happens.. (Click on the image to activate!) 

Reminders of hoopla gone by. Check out this blog of "Stuff Charlotte never built."

(Click on the images to activate the animation.)

(Top) Independence Boulevard: 

This image features a section where Village Lake Drive hits Independence. This is just south of where W.T. Harris Boulevard and Margaret Wallace Road intersect with Independence. The small stand-alone building is a Ruby Tuesday, which fronts a Dollar General and a Post Office, separated by a sea of parking spaces. Keihly is not proposing destroying these buildings, but simply, how would the street and city-scape look differently if the buildings were aligned closer to the street edge, with the parking in the back, making the street edge more walkable? Granted, Independence Boulevard is a long, auto-oriented strip, but if everything were fronting the street, it could be a completely different place. What do you think?

(Bottom) Central Avenue: 

Central Avenue is quite walkable in many parts. This illustration shows how it could be improved and the gaps filled in. Even the simple moves of putting the buildings at the corners shape the space and create more enclosure, which feels nicer than the wide-open parking lot if you’re walking past. Keihly is not saying we should tear down the beloved Dairy Queen, she just aims to show how it would create a different street feeling if the buildings were right at the edge of the street - closer to its eager eaters. 

Keihly Moore is a graduate student in the Urban Design and Architecture departments at UNC Charlotte. These illustrations will become part of an urban design tool kit to start a discussion about regional urban design issues. 

Movies, depicted as a transit map. See the full image.

Movies, depicted as a transit map. See the full image.

Get a clearer look at where growth was and wasn’t in the Charlotte metro region, and the Southeastern U.S. 

Get a clearer look at where growth was and wasn’t in the Charlotte metro region, and the Southeastern U.S.